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MARK FLORMAN

Mark is a businessman and entrepreneur active in policy making. His mission has been focused on driving and measuring economic & social impact and harnessing human potential.

Chris Donnelly, The Statecraft Institute

Mark’s riveting address to the security, defence and development professionals, policy analysts and political advisers opened up a brand new perspective for this expert group committed to the reform of national and international institutions. His impressive speech, focusing on the evolution of the three pillars – state, society, and commerce, and based on his extensive personal experience working in the developing world and on UK social justice, connected and contextualised diverse issues in a most original and creative way, stimulating vigorous debate. It was acclaimed as the most inspirational and though-provoking session of 2015.
Chris Donnelly, The Statecraft Institute

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Corruption in crisis?

‘Part of the change is demographic: Over the last decade, Latin America’s middle class has grown by roughly 40 million people and now outnumbers those living in poverty. The middle class wants more than jobs or survival, more than “rouba mas faz.” As taxpayers, they want honest government and are no longer willing to overlook abuses of…

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Global meets Local – How to solve the paradox of Brexit

The last issue of the Spectator before the EU referendum proclaimed that Britain should go ‘Out, and into the world’, suggesting that, free from the prison of the EU and its stultifying bureaucracy, opportunities abound through greater participation in the global economy. This has been the first line of defence for many a brexiteer, suggesting that by partnering up with mainly non-EU economies in a plethora of new free trade deals, we were getting closer to the real action in global commerce…

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The Antifragile Age

‘The need for food security favoured the intensive production of a few crops and the displacement of species that couldn’t compete in terms of yield or ease of mechanisation. As a result, just four crops — wheat, rice, maize and soyabean — now provide more than half of the world’s food. More than seven billion…

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Possiblism and progress

‘My mother explained the magic with this washing machine the very, very first day. She said, ‘Now Hans, we have loaded the laundry. The machine will make the work. And now we can go to the library.’ Because this is the magic: you load the laundry, and what do you get out of the machine?…

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The risk that was, the risk that is

‘On my last morning in Pecs, the peach colours of the synagogue still give an optimistic tint to Kossuth Square. Yet the piazza is now dominated by something else: the latest set of election posters set up by Fidelitas, Fidesz’s youth wing. The enemies of an ethnically pure Hungary are splashed across their canvas. The…

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The myth of meritocracy

‘More recently, however, concerns about the actual effects of meritocracies are rising. In the case of gender, research across disciplines shows that believing an organization or its policies are merit-based makes it easier to overlook the subconscious operation of bias. People in such organizations assume that everything is already meritocratic, and so there is no need for…

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The dictator’s survival guide

Over half of the world today lives under a non-democratically elected leader. As Zimbabwe’s new president Emmerson Mnangagwa celebrates his 100 days in office this month, we are reminded of the ironies of the image of Mugabe’s resignation that many believed to be impossible just weeks before it came to pass: the frail 90 year old man…

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